Common Foods High in Saturated Fat

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Foods High in Saturated Fat

Saturated fats are an unhealthy class of fats. Unfortunately, they are present in many foods. The majority of foods high in saturated fat come from animal sources. These sources include beef, pork, chicken, shellfish, egg yolks, and dairy such as cream, milk, and butter. Certain non-animal food sources also have high levels. These sources include coconut oil, palm oil, lard, and vegetable shortenings. The following table provides a list of foods high in saturated fat. Total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol are provided per serving. Also included are healthier alternatives with little to no saturated fat per serving.

As a note, saturated fats contribute to elevated LDL (bad) cholesterol levels increasing one’s risks of heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. They are also a key risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association advises that they account for less than 7% of daily caloric intake. This percentage equates to less than 17 grams per day based on a 2200 calorie diet. You can reduce such consumption by limiting consumption of foods high in saturated fat and by eating foods high in monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats.

 

Foods High in Saturated Fat (Marked in Red)

Food

Total Fat (g)

Saturated Fat (g)

Cholesterol (mg)

Dairy Products

Milk (8 oz. Serving Size)
Skim milk

0

0

5

Milk (1% lowfat)

3

2

10

Milk (2% lowfat)

5

3

20

Milk (whole)

8

5

25

Ice Cream ( lowfat milk)

5

3

20

Ice cream (whole milk)

13

8

45

Eggs (1 Egg)
Egg white

0

0

0

Egg with yolk

5

2

185

Yogurt (4 oz. Serving Size)
Plain yogurt (skim milk)

0

0

5

Plain yogurt (lowfat milk)

4

2

15

Plain yogurt (whole milk)

8

5

30

Cheeses (2 oz. serving)
Mozzarella (part skim)

10

6

35

Mozzarella (whole milk)

12

7

45

Swiss

16

10

25

American

12

8

35

Cheddar

12

8

35

 

Fats & Oils (1 Tablespoon)    

Butter

12

7

30

Lard

13

5

15

Margarine

11

2

0

Olive oil

14

2

0

Canola oil

14

1

0

Corn oil

14

2

0

Safflower oil

14

1

0

Sunflower oil

14

1

0

Meats

Beef (6 oz. serving)
Beef tenderloin

15

6

145

Sirloin (broiled)

11

4

105

T-Bone (broiled)

15

5

95

Top round (broiled)

8

3

105

Hamburger (85% lean)

25

10

115

Hot dogs (2)

35

14

65

Pork (6 oz. serving)
Pork tenderloin (roasted)

8

3

135

Pork shoulder (roasted)

24

14

155

Pork rump (roasted)

24

9

165

Bacon (fried)

70

23

185

Sausages (2 links, fried)

45

15

125

Chicken (6 oz. serving)
White meat (no skin)

6

1

140

White meat (skin)

12

4

140

Dark meat (no skin)

18

5

160

Dark meat (skin)

26

7

160

Turkey (6 oz. serving)
White meat (no skin)

6

2

120

White meat (skin)

14

4

120

Dark meat (no skin)

12

4

145

Dark meat (skin)

20

6

150

Lamb (6 oz. serving)
Leg of lamb (roasted)

11

4

150

Lamb loin chop (roasted)

28

11

125

Seafood (6 oz. serving)
Salmon (baked or broiled)

22

4

110

Tuna (baked or broiled)

10

12

80

Halibut (baked or broiled)

5

1

65

Lobster (steamed)

1

0

120

Clams (steamed)

3

0

70

Shrimp (steamed)

4

1

330

Nuts and Seeds (1 oz. serving)

Almonds

14

1

0

Peanuts

11

2

 0
Cashews

14

2

0

Pecans

20

2

0

Pistachio nuts

7

1

0

Walnuts

18

2

0

Flax seeds

12

1

0

Sunflower seeds

7

1

0

Pumpkin Seeds

12

2

0

Sesame Seeds

14

2

0

EMG’s Nutrition Homepage: How to Eat Healthy

External Resources: Wikipedia: Saturated Fatty Acids

1. Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation (2003). Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Diseases (WHO technical report series 916). World Health Organization. pp. 81–94. ISBN 92-4-120916-X.

2. Kris-Etherton PM, Innis S (September 2007). “Position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada: Dietary Fatty Acids”. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 107 (9): 1599–1611 [1603]. PMID 17936958.

3. Chowdhury R, Warnakula S, Kunutsor S, Crowe F, Ward HA, Johnson L, Franco OH, Butterworth AS, Forouhi NG, Thompson SG, Khaw KT, Mozaffarian D, Danesh J, Di Angelantonio E (2014). “Association of dietary, circulating, and supplement fatty acids with coronary risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis”. Ann. Intern. Med. 160 (6): 398–406.